Job vacancy: web developer

Spanner lying on a laptop keyboard

The University is looking for a web developer to join the web team.

  • Job reference: Web Developer SB1005R1
  • Salary £25,013 – £29,837 per annum (grade 5)
  • Required skills: PHP, JavaScript/jQuery, HTML, CSS, SQL, Ajax
  • Fixed term: 3 years
  • Start: as soon as possible
  • Closing date for applications: Friday 25 April 2014

The main purpose of the role will be in helping maintain and support web services, notably where changes need to be made to coding and other infrastructure elements, so a solid and demonstrable knowledge of PHP, MySQL, JavaScript, HTML and CSS is required. Experience of WordPress (including WordPress Multi Site) will also be of an advantage.

Our enterprise web content management system is the commercial, Java-based TerminalFour Site Manager (although we’ve never had to dabble with any Java) running on an Oracle database; and we’re working a lot with WordPress (and MySQL) too these days (both stand-alone installations and WordPress Multi Site). Pre-knowledge of either is not required as training will be offered.

Regarding existing technologies, we’re currently using an adapted version of the Blueprint CSS framework and a patchwork of jQuery plugins, but we have plans to move to the Bootstrap framework, the Sass CSS pre-processor and a host of other time-saving goodies. We currently don’t use any particular PHP framework, although PHPMaker has been used to help generate a few applications; that’s not to say that we’re not option to the adoption of a PHP framework. We often use Agile methodologies in our project work and use Trello to keep ourselves organised.

It’s not all about hardcore coding, however. An important element of the job will be to deal with website users and content creators in a support and perhaps even training role. The web team offers first, second and third line support, and you will be expected to get involved there too.

The web team is currently made up of four members (web manager, web architect, web editor and web apprentice) with a fifth member on secondment to Corporate Communications. Speaking as someone who is obviously somewhat biased, the web team is a good, fun and supportive place to work. Do you fancy joining us?

More details can be found on the University’s job vacancy website — the job reference code is SB1005R1.

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Job vacancy: web developer

Spanner lying on a laptop keyboard

The University is looking for an experienced web developer to join the web team.

  • Grade: 5
  • Salary: £24, 766 — £29,541 per year
  • Fixed term: 3 years
  • Start: as soon as possible
  • Closing date for applications: Friday 19 July 2013

The main focus of the job will be in helping design and develop small-scale web applications, and add additional functionality to existing pages/websites so a solid and demonstrable knowledge of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and PHP is required.

Our enterprise web content management system is the commercial, Java-based TerminalFour Site Manager (although we’ve never had to dabble with any Java) running on an Oracle database; and we’re working a lot with WordPress (and MySQL) too these days (both stand-alone installations and WordPress multisite). Pre-knowledge of either is not required as training will be offered.

We’re currently using an adapted version of the Blueprint CSS framework and a patchwork of jQuery plugins, but we have plans to move to the Bootstrap framework, the LESS CSS pre-processor and a host of other Node.js enabled time-saving goodies. We currently don’t use any particular PHP framework, although PHPMaker has been used to help generate a few applications; that’s not to say that we’re not option to the adoption of a PHP framework. We often use Agile methodologies in our project work and use Trello to keep ourselves organised.

It’s not all about hardcore coding, however. An important element of the job will be to deal with website users and content creators in a support and perhaps even training role. The web team offers first, second and third line support, and you will be expected to get involved there too.

The web team is currently made up of four members (web manager, web architect, web editor and web apprentice) with a fifth member on secondment to Corporate Communications for 18 months. Speaking as someone who is obviously somewhat biased, the web team is a good, fun and supportive place to work. Do you fancy joining us?

More details can be found on the University’s job vacancy website – the job reference code is SB1005.

Essential web developer skills

Lazy man sitting on a sofa

Lazy Guy photo by David Clark (iStockphoto)

In the next few months we’re going to be gearing up to fill two posts (one replacement and one new post) to join the web team: a developer and an apprentice. So I’ve been thinking about a couple of things:

  1. What skills we are looking for in new team members?
  2. What skills do we already have that we’re maybe not using to their best potential within the team, or which have become a little sloppy and undisciplined that we need to work on.

I liked this comment in an article by Dan Frost on .net; it is point 6:

That search for ‘essential web developer skills’ brings a nice answer from Michael Greer (The Onion’s CTO) on Quora:

Laziness:
Refuses to do anything twice: writes a script or algo[rithim] for it.
Cowardice:
Thinks to test, worries over load and code impact.
Recklessness:
Tries new stuff constantly, launches same-day ideas.
Cowardice is a nice way of phrasing ‘attention to detail’.

“10 things web developers must know to become truly amazing” on .net

I remember a conversation years ago with an architect who said that he valued lazy people, because they showed him how to do things with the least amount of effort. It was from him that I also learned about cowpaths (“look where the paths are already being formed by behaviour and then formalize them”).

I like how Greer put it: refuse to do anything twice. Don’t repeat yourself; the DRY principle. Use frameworks, save snippets of code that you use often (my coding editor allows me to collect code snippets in an in-built library), don’t reinvent the wheel again and again.

My favourite Web developer add-ons for Firefox

Mozilla released Firefox 4.0 on Tuesday—it has already been downloaded 16,041,437 times; that’s about 92 downloads a second!— and there is a lot to commend it for: a clean look, that’s not too far away from both Google Chrome and Internet Explorer 9 and it’s much faster too.

While I use Google Chrome for most of my day-to-day browsing I still use Firefox for Web development, largely thanks to the number of mature add-ons available for it. These are my favourites:

1. Firebug

20110324-firefox4-firebug

Firebug is the number one reason that I use Firefox. Sure, Chrome and Internet Explorer have their own Web developer tools but none of them come close to Firebug for its awesomeness.

That said, I recently tried out Opera Dragonfly and I was really impressed.

2. Web Developer

20110324-firefox4-webdeveloper

A close second is Chris Penderick’s Web Developer toolbar that adds all sorts of useful tools to Firefox: disable CSS, outline headings and tables on the page, show HTML classes and IDs, show image sizes as overlays on the images. Brilliant!

3. ColorZilla

20110324-firefox4-colorzilla

The most useful feature of ColorZilla for me is the eyedropper tool that allows me to sample a colour on a Web page and find out the RGB or HEX value for it.

4. HTML Validator

20110324-firefox4-htmlvalidator

HTML Validator does exactly what it suggests that it does: it shows HTML validation information in the Firefox add-on bar (what used to be the status bar) at the foot of the browser viewport.

It’s very useful for at-a-glance error checking; obviously, recognising that HTML validation is an ideal and a guide rather than a hard-and-fast rule.

5. Wappalyzer

20110324-firefox4-wappalyzer

Wappalyzer is a new add-on for me that adds to Firefox the functionality that I’ve been enjoying with the Chrome Sniffer extension in Google Chrome.

It shows you in the AwesomeBar what technologies are being used, e.g. JavaScript framework, server type, content management system, web statistics, etc.

6. RSS Icon in Awesombar

20110324-firefox4-rssiconinawesomebar

For some unfathomable reason Mozilla has removed the RSS icon that appears in the AwesomeBar when you visit a page that has an RSS autodiscovery tag, such as the University homepage.

That’s where RSS Icon in Awesombar (sic) comes in. It… well, puts an RSS icon in the AwesomeBar.

7. Tab Mix Plus

20110324-firefox4-tabmixplus

There are some options within Firefox that I still cannot believe are missing. There is still no way to, by default, open your homepage when you open a new tab.

Tab Mix Plus allows you to set this option—and a whole lot more, like being able to duplicate existing tabs, or protect or lock tabs so that you don’t accidentally close them.

Over to you…

What are your favourite Firefox add-ons, for Web development or otherwise?