What developers think of Internet Explorer

I like this self-deprecating advert from Microsoft about Internet Explorer 9.

Only today I was thinking how refreshing it is that I now don’t have to worry too much about testing webpages in Internet Explorer 9. Everything just works now.

Sure, it doesn’t have the same level of support for HTML5 and CSS3 that Chrome, Firefox and Opera have but it does the basics really well and doesn’t have the same weird quirks that IE7 and IE8 have that require obscure hacks and workarounds.

Besides, at the moment all the major browsers have varying levels of support for these new Web standards-in-the-making. That’s why we’ve got tools like Modernizr.

Let’s hope that Internet Explorer’s support of Web standards grows from strength to strength.

Either that or they see sense and move to using the WebKit rendering engine! 😉

My favourite Web developer add-ons for Firefox

Mozilla released Firefox 4.0 on Tuesday—it has already been downloaded 16,041,437 times; that’s about 92 downloads a second!— and there is a lot to commend it for: a clean look, that’s not too far away from both Google Chrome and Internet Explorer 9 and it’s much faster too.

While I use Google Chrome for most of my day-to-day browsing I still use Firefox for Web development, largely thanks to the number of mature add-ons available for it. These are my favourites:

1. Firebug

20110324-firefox4-firebug

Firebug is the number one reason that I use Firefox. Sure, Chrome and Internet Explorer have their own Web developer tools but none of them come close to Firebug for its awesomeness.

That said, I recently tried out Opera Dragonfly and I was really impressed.

2. Web Developer

20110324-firefox4-webdeveloper

A close second is Chris Penderick’s Web Developer toolbar that adds all sorts of useful tools to Firefox: disable CSS, outline headings and tables on the page, show HTML classes and IDs, show image sizes as overlays on the images. Brilliant!

3. ColorZilla

20110324-firefox4-colorzilla

The most useful feature of ColorZilla for me is the eyedropper tool that allows me to sample a colour on a Web page and find out the RGB or HEX value for it.

4. HTML Validator

20110324-firefox4-htmlvalidator

HTML Validator does exactly what it suggests that it does: it shows HTML validation information in the Firefox add-on bar (what used to be the status bar) at the foot of the browser viewport.

It’s very useful for at-a-glance error checking; obviously, recognising that HTML validation is an ideal and a guide rather than a hard-and-fast rule.

5. Wappalyzer

20110324-firefox4-wappalyzer

Wappalyzer is a new add-on for me that adds to Firefox the functionality that I’ve been enjoying with the Chrome Sniffer extension in Google Chrome.

It shows you in the AwesomeBar what technologies are being used, e.g. JavaScript framework, server type, content management system, web statistics, etc.

6. RSS Icon in Awesombar

20110324-firefox4-rssiconinawesomebar

For some unfathomable reason Mozilla has removed the RSS icon that appears in the AwesomeBar when you visit a page that has an RSS autodiscovery tag, such as the University homepage.

That’s where RSS Icon in Awesombar (sic) comes in. It… well, puts an RSS icon in the AwesomeBar.

7. Tab Mix Plus

20110324-firefox4-tabmixplus

There are some options within Firefox that I still cannot believe are missing. There is still no way to, by default, open your homepage when you open a new tab.

Tab Mix Plus allows you to set this option—and a whole lot more, like being able to duplicate existing tabs, or protect or lock tabs so that you don’t accidentally close them.

Over to you…

What are your favourite Firefox add-ons, for Web development or otherwise?

Internet Explorer from version 1.0 to 9.0

Since Microsoft Internet Explorer 9 was released Andy—you know! Andy!—wondered what it would be like to install every version of Microsoft’s Web browser starting at IE 1.0 under Windows 95 and working all the way up through IE 6.0 on Windows XP to IE 9.0 which is only available for Windows Vista or 7 and compare them. His video is fascinating.

Acid tests

In the video he mentions Acid1, Acid2 and Acid3 (these links take you to Wikipedia) which are test pages that are used by browser manufacturers to check for problems in the way that they display Web pages.

  • Acid1 tests how a browser uses the Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) 1.0 specification.
  • Acid2 tests CSS 2.1 styling, HTML, PNG images, and data URIs (a way to include data within pages as though they were external resources).
  • Acid3 tests the Document Object Model (that is the structure of the page) and how the browser handles the JavaScript scripting language which is often used to add interactivity to a Web page.

You can check how well your browser does by clicking on the links above, which take you to the tests themselves.

The browser that I’m using to write this in (Google Chrome 11 beta) passes all three tests, even scoing 100/100 in Acid3. Internet Explorer 9.0 passes tests 1 and 2 and scores an admirable 95/100 in Acid 3; Firefox 4.0 scores 97/100.

But I digress…

Internet Explorer 3.0… without the internet

My first introduction to Internet Explorer was IE 3.0 under Windows 3.11 for Workgroups when I was learning HTML back in 1997. I wasn’t even connected to the World Wide Web, which is fine because the readme file suggested that the internet was just one option:

This product enables you to browse and view HTML documents on the network, in addition to documents on the World Wide Web or Internet. Other services, such as Gopher and FTP, and NNTP news support, are also available.

I still have the installer for Microsoft Internet Explorer 3.0 for Microsoft Windows 3.1 from November 1996).

Here are the system requirements:

  • A personal computer, 386 processor or higher
  • Microsoft Windows 3.1 or 3.11 or  Microsoft Windows for Workgroups 3.1 or 3.11
  • At least 4 megabytes (MB) of memory
  • A VGA monitor or better
  • A mouse
  • A modem with a speed of at least 9600 or a LAN  connection

Personal computers and the Web have come a long way since then.

What browsers have our visitors been using this year?

Browsers used to visit the University website during 2010

The topic of which Web browsers are the most popular came up at our weekly Web team meeting this morning.  So I went away and did a little digging in our Google Analytics account.  (Bear in mind that I have no degree of expertise in statistics.)

The issue was raised because we’re currently debugging an issue in Google Chrome, and someone wondered out-loud whether it was really worth trying to fix in such a minor browser if it worked fine in IE, Safari, Firefox and Opera.  The statistics showed that Google Chrome really isn’t that minor a browser now with a share of 11.98% of all visits.

Google Analytics

Looking at the last 12 months (from 01 January – yesterday) I was surprised to see that in September Safari overtook Firefox as the second most used browser after Internet Explorer.

It makes sense that Internet Explorer and Safari, which are the default browsers in Windows and MacOS X respectively, should be first and second, but I don’t really understand immediately why Safari should overtake Firefox in September, even taking into account the new student intake which I would have assumed were also included in the January–June figures?

The Safari figures also include handheld Apple devices, such as iPhone, iPod and iPad, but overall those platforms together only make up 0.8% of the total annual figure.

As a general indication of trend, comparing the January figures to those for December so far, it’s interesting to note that both usage figures for IE and Firefox dropped while Safari, Chrome and Opera grew, with Chrome growing the most.

Chrome UP 5.58%
Safari UP 3.66%
Opera UP 0.13%
Firefox DOWN 4.76%
Internet Explorer DOWN 4.83%

Other browsers

This graph and table, of course, only mention “The Big Five”.  There are other browsers out there.

The statistics for 2010 to date show that 185 different browsers have been used to access the University website.  Most of the other browsers (not those listed above) are for mobile devices, .e.g.

  • BlackBerry
  • HTC HD2
  • HTC Touch
  • HTC TyTN
  • LG
  • Samsung
  • Opera Mini
  • Palm
  • Playstation 3
  • Playstation Portable
  • Xda Ignito

Interesting to see games consoles (Playstation 3 and Playstation Portable) appearing on the list. Over the past 12 months the University website has been visited 451 times using a Playstation 3.  Not quite enough to warrant commissioning a St Andrews level on Grand Theft Auto or Call of Duty.

Broken down by OS

Breaking the browsers down by operating system, across the entire year (01 January–12 December) here are the top 10 browsers by operating system

1 Internet Explorer Windows 43.6%
2 Firefox Windows 18.9%
3 Safari Mac 18.85%
4 Chrome Windows 8.7%
5 Firefox Mac 4.88%
6 Safari Windows 0.93%
7 Chrome Mac 0.91%
8 Firefox Linux 0.65%
9 Opera Windows 0.61%
10 Safari iPhone 0.55%

It will be interesting to see how that moves over the next 12 months and whether things have changed dramatically this time next year.