Trello now has a calendar view

Trello now with added calendar

Trello now with added calendar

It’s no secret that we are big fans of Trello here.

A fabulous feature they added in August—which may make the tool more useful to some people—is the addition of a calendar view.

For as long as I can remember, Trello has always had the ability to set due-dates on cards. These dates turn orange when the due date is near, and red when it has past. A useful visual cue. But now being able to view cards’ due dates by week or month in this new calendar view is tremendously helpful.

It’s been really well thought out too:

  • You can drag and drop cards from one date to the next to change the due date.
  • New cards can be added directly to the calendar.
  • Dates with more than one card clearly show you there are more cards, which appear in a small, scrollable pop-up window when you click on them

If you’ve not already, then sign up for Trello. It’s a really useful, flexible tool to tracking just about anything.

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Trello at St Andrews

At the meeting of the Scottish Web Folk, on Thursday 31 May held at the University of Edinburgh, I gave the above presentation about Trello from Fog Creek Software.

Trello is, according to its own help text,

a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, Trello tells you what’s being worked on, who’s working on what, and where something is in a process.

We’ve been using it since December 2011 within the web team at the University of St Andrews and are finding it really useful.

Summary of presentation

The first part of the presentation outlines something of our journey from a team of two members to (hopefully) six by the end of 2012. As our project backlog grew we knew that we needed to manage projects and tasks more collaboratively, to get details out of people’s heads and into a centralised tool.

We started to adopt Agile practices in 2008 which led to us creating a scrum board in the office. But in September 2012 Steve, our Web Manager, broke his foot and when he returned to working from home in December we knew that we needed to move the board online.

We had checked out a number of online, free and hosted applications such as Basecamp, Pivotal Tracker and Jira. However, Trello proved to be for us the perfect match.

The second part of the presentation takes a quick tour through the Trello interface and how it works.

The last part of the presentation involved a hands-on demo of the software. I’ve replaced this with two simple slides representing the two ways that we use Trello.

  1. We have one board called “Web team” which tracks the big picture: project requests, current projects being worked on, know issues, admin tasks, backlog of tasks, etc.
  2. Then we have multiple project boards, one for each project. These have a standard number of columns (backlog, in progress, waiting for, testing, done) and the labels (new feature, enhancement, PHP/JavaScript, bug, documentation, web team admin) are the same across every project.

If you have any questions or observations please leave a comment below or email me directly (gareth.saunders@st-andrews.ac.uk).

Note: this article was also posted to the Scottish Web Folk blog.

Moving our team task board online to Trello

20111104-taskboard

For the last few years the Web team have been using, and adapting, a form of Agile/Kanban board to manage what tasks need to be done and by whom. It has served us very well, but this week we moved it online to Trello, a free, hosted service from Fog Creek Software.

Why we went digital

When we started using the board the Web team consisted of three people: Steve the Web Manager, me (Gareth) the Assistant Web Manager, and Chris the Web software developer.

We all sat in the same room together, and the board was just a few steps away from our desks. It was handy, and quick, and accessibly. But as the team has grown we’ve now spilled out into an office on another floor of the same building.

It’s not quite so easy now for all five members of the team to add to or move tickets around the board. Occasionally some of us work from home too.

The main catalyst, however, was in response to a recent crisis in which our intrepid leader, Steve, fell of a ladder and broke his foot (you can see photos of his recent x-rays on TwitPic). He could be working from home for some time now and we wanted to make him feel included so we moved to Trello.

Trello

20111104-trello

It was pretty painless to set up and add users to our newly created organisation and board. I then spent a couple of hours migrating our open tickets over from the whiteboard into Trello.

Labelling and assigning tasks to users was simple thanks to Trello’s excellent keyboard shortcuts.

I did wonder if I’d miss physically moving cards from one column to the next, but Trello has a neat little trick whereby when you ‘pick up’ a card it rotates it a little to indicate that it’s been picked-up. It’s really effective and surprisingly satisfying:

20111104-trellomove

We’ve decided to trial working with Trello for a few months, certainly while Steve is recovering and may have to work from home.

So far the response from the rest of the team has been very positive (after we switched off email notifications). It’s attractive, it’s simple and it’s intuitive. No doubt we’ll report back in a few months with our thoughts on how the move from analogue to digital has gone.