Horizon scanning at IWMW10

Earlier this month Gareth and I attended the Institutional Web Management Workshop 2010 (IWMW10), held at the University of Sheffield. It was my first time at IWMW, and since I still feel slightly new to the Web in a higher education environment, it was a good opportunity for me to take in the sorts of issues that are commonly faced by institutional web teams.

Turbulece (sky before a thunderstorm)

Turbulent times - we certainly experienced that in Sheffield's weather

It turns out that, right now, the main issue is the effect of the economy. The theme for this year’s IWMW was ‘the web in turbulent times’. Many of the presentations focussed on the doom and gloom. This, coupled with the horrendous weather we experienced while in Sheffield, did little to dispel the stereotype that it’s grim up north (or, in our case, a couple of hundred miles down south).

Luckily, there was plenty of techy chit-chat too. It still fits in with the theme. The web is permanently turbulent. (I think it was designed like that because turbulence creates bigger waves, leading to a more enjoyable surfing experience.)

One of the key characteristics of the web for me is the fact that it is always changing, always developing. Once you’ve got on top of it, something else comes along for you to learn. That is what makes working in the web such an interesting challenge.

An update to the language of the web

Two of the biggest developments on the horizon were covered by one speaker, Patrick H Lauke from Opera Software. The first was HTML5 (and friends), the upcoming update to the language of the web.

The headline is that HTML5 does not replace the existing version of HTML. It is the same but with “more bling”. By the looks of it, it will be much easier and more intuitive to code as well. But the specification is not yet complete, and there are hurdles still to leap in the form of compatibility, accessibility and a question mark over video formats.

We were given a demonstration of some HTML5 functionality in the Opera browser. A lot of what HTML5 adds is exciting and sensible. But I think there will be a rough period while the creases are ironed out. The demonstration was promising, but it is clearly not yet the finished product.

Nonetheless, I read an interesting article recently outlining five reasons why you can use HTML5 today. It’s definitely something we should be turning our attention to sooner rather than later.

Mobile web

Later, in a smaller breakout session, Patrick H Lauke spoke about the mobile web and how to make your website mobile-friendly. Phones are becoming ‘smarter’ and connectivity is advancing. People will increasingly come to expect to be able to browse the web while out and about just as efficiently as they can on a desktop machine.

But the mobile web throws up a whole extra set of issues, adding to the already-complex set of challenges we have been accustomed to facing for years. There is a huge range of screen sizes and browsers in use, and mobile web designs must try to accommodate them all. Then there is the question of how to streamline the website for mobiles without ‘dumbing down’ the content.

Like HTML5, the mobile web still has a bit to go. As we found out in Sheffield, the mobile web cannot yet be fully relied upon in the same way we can rely upon the web on a PC. But that is why HTML5 and the mobile web are for the future, even though we need to start thinking about them now.

Reflections on my first IWMW

Overall, I found my first IWMW to be a great learning experience. It has given me plenty to think about. Although I was of course aware of the issues surrounding HTML5 and the mobile web, what I learnt at IWMW has helped me focus on the key aspects to look towards.

In addition, there were plenty of other interesting talks. Particular standouts included Jeremy Speller’s about disaster communication in a crisis and Paul Boag’s persuasive presentation about cutting down the amount of content on an unwieldy website.

Due to the anticipated sector-wide cutbacks, there is uncertainty about whether IWMW will take place next year. I think it would be a real shame if it was not held in 2011, because at my first IWMW it was clear that the event is a hugely useful way to discuss ideas and meet people facing similar issues.

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2 thoughts on “Horizon scanning at IWMW10

  1. Pingback: Blogging for the University of St Andrews web team « doctorvee

  2. Pingback: First steps into mobile | University of St Andrews Web team

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